CBD oil or cannabidiol oil is a substance derived from the hemp or cannabis plant containing high amounts of the cannabinoid cannabidiol.

Most CBD oil comes from industrial hemp rather than psychoactive marijuana strains; while the two plants are related, industrial hemp does not contain nearly as much psychoactive tetrahydrocannabiol, another cannabinoid better known as THC.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is the 2nd most prevalent cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant, and it is emerging as a promising therapy for many illnesses that experts have previously considered to be untreatable, including:

• Pain (neuropathic, chronic, cancer-related, etc.)

• Epilepsy

• Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

• Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

• Parkinson’s

• Inflammation

• Acne

• Dyskinesia

• Psoriasis

• Broken Bones

• Mad Cow Disease

• Depression

• Bacterial Infections

• Diabetes

• Rheumatoid Arthritis

• Nausea

• Anxiety

• ADHD

• Schizophrenia

• Substance Abuse/Withdrawal

• Heart Disease

• Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

No. THC is the psychoactive cannabinoid that makes you high; CBD does not have any psychoactive properties. While many CBD oils, particularly full-spectrum products, contain trace amounts of THC, it is not enough to make you high.

If you are at a risk for random drug tests, for example through your job, you may wish to choose a CBD oil that is entirely devoid of THC.

CBD oil is generally considered to be safe for most people, and few people experience side effects. A 2017 literature review, however, noted that CBD oil can be linked to the following side effects in some cases:

• Fatigue

• Diarrhea

• Changes to appetite

• Changes to weight

It's important to note that the studies featured in this review mostly used higher doses of CBD oil than are generally available for over-the-counter use. The study authors also noted that more studies researching CBD side effects after "real chronic administration" would be necessary for a more conclusive safety profile.

Clinical trials are still confirming the efficacy of CBD oil, but many individuals have noted that it has a positive effect on their health and well-being.

Yes! Most CBD oil is produced from industrial hemp, the same plant used to make hemp textiles and hemp seeds. This plant contains trace amounts of psychoactive THC – not enough to make you high and usually not even enough to make you fail a drug test.

Before adding CBD oil to your regimen, as with any supplement, be sure to check with your doctor to make sure that it's a good choice for you. This is especially true if you are taking certain anti-seizure medications.

CBD oil can be consumed in a myriad of ways: tinctures, oil vaping, capsules, sublinguals, or even topicals. When taking CBD, always follow the instructions on the package of the product you have purchased.

No. THC is the psychoactive cannabinoid that makes you high; CBD does not have any psychoactive properties. While many CBD oils, particularly full-spectrum products, contain trace amounts of THC, it is not enough to make you high.

If you are at a risk for random drug tests, for example through your job, you may wish to choose a CBD oil that is entirely devoid of THC.

All cannabinoids, including CBD, produce effects in the body by attaching to certain receptors.

The human body produces certain cannabinoids on its own. It also has two receptors for cannabinoids, called the CB1 receptors and CB2 receptors.

CB1 receptors are present throughout the body, but many are in the brain.

The CB1 receptors in the brain deal with coordination and movement, pain, emotions, and mood, thinking, appetite, and memories, and other functions. THC attaches to these receptors.

CB2 receptors are more common in the immune system. They affect inflammation and pain.

Researchers once believed that CBD attached to these CB2 receptors, but it now appears that CBD does not attach directly to either receptor.

Instead, it seems to direct the body to use more of its own cannabinoids.